Great Schools Ratings

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Bellows and Murray Avenue are now rated among the best schools

 

in the U.S. by one system, Great Schools, Inc. Two schools in Rye made the grade, and 4 elementaries in Scarsdale. Have a look.

What do you think?

2 thoughts on “Great Schools Ratings

  1. Great Schools No More! When we moved here all of the schools in the district were well regarded. Now only one, Murray gets a decent rating. Forget about the rating for the high school. they have plummeted over the years. Whenever the community is asked to comment and make suggestions for ways to reduce the budget, of course the school board promotes their own agenda, The Princeton Plan, when there was so much vocal support in favor of neighborhood schools. While obscuring this plan on the website and not publicizing it, it means that neighborhood elementary school kids will be bussed across the district. Forget the cost of bussing these kids. Larger class sizes are inevitable, since our well paid Dr. Fried failed miserably at achieving any meaningful concessions from the unions who run the schools. Now he leaves with a hefty pension. We know that the next superindent will be vetted by the board to support this plan. Vote no and show the board a lesson. By the way, is it a conincidence that two board members are Mamaroneck Avenue residents? Will their housing values rise while ours will fall?

  2. I’ve looked at this website and contacted them regarding their scoring practices. Their scores and ratings are actually just about completely meaningless. As an example, look at Central School. There is a comparitively large population of children with learning difficulties and special needs in this school. The programs and services offered are stellar and the children are attending one of the top public schools in the country for those with needs. As a result, these children score higher than most special needs children in other districts. The “regular ed” children make top scores compared to the “regular ed” children of other districts. But the scores are calculated in aggregate. If the scores were to be evaluated separately, the ratings would clearly indicate that Central school is one of the best in the nation, whether the child is “regular ed” or “special ed”.

    Parents have no way of determining whether a school has a low rating due to a larger population of special needs children or if its due to lack of excellence in teaching. There is also no way for a parent to find the best schools for children with special needs.

    I contacted the State dept of Ed and was told that actually I could figure this out on my own and was given instruction on how. It would be about the equivalent of a thesis project to get the “real” scores.

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