Campaign to Honor New Rochelle Civil Rights Hero

Print

arthur pulley

Arthur Pulley with wife, Bernice Cosey-Pulley, at the Pelham Memorial Day Parade, May 27, 2013, where Arthur was honored. Mr. Pulley was holding a cherished photograph of himself being thanked for his service by President Truman.

 

Submitted through theLoop Submission Portal by Andy Reynolds on behalf of Pulley family friend, April Sandmeyer

Please consider helping the  YouCaring crowdfunding campaign for New Rochelle civil rights hero Arthur L. Pulley.

Arthur L. Pulley Funeral and Memorial Fund

https://www.youcaring.com/arthur-l-pulley-memorial-504336

For more about Arthur L. Pulley, contact Nicholas S. Pulley directly, via the YouCaring page.
A few highlights from Arthur Pulley’s life:
  • Ended segregation in the New Rochelle school system
  • He and his wife marched with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Washington in 1963
  • He was the oldest living black graduate of the Yale Law School
  • He and his wife are the namesakes of an award for Peace and Social Justice at Yale University
  • Founder of Meals-on-Wheels of New Rochelle
  • Founder of the Black Lawyers of Westchester County
  • Founder of the Inter-religious Council of Churches of New Rochelle
  • Served for 42 years as Trustee of Bethesda Baptist Church.
  • Most known for founding the Arthur L. Pulley Jr. Center for Creativity in Greenfield Park, NY, which was made available free of charge to all individuals and groups that adhered to the “no alcohol, tobacco, drugs or firearms” policy. Over the years, over 7000 people, many of whom were socially deprived children, have enjoyed a day in the country. Artists, writers, and families were given lodging for weeks at a time and several plays were written there. Over 50 scholarships to advance social justice were given. The Center is in dire need of financial support.

3 thoughts on “Campaign to Honor New Rochelle Civil Rights Hero

  1. 99 year old Arthur L. Pulley served in the 372nd Infantry Regiment in World War II, a segregated regiment. His rank in the U.S. Army was the highest NCO rank (the last 1st Sgt. in the segregated Company K). He is holding a cherished photo of President Truman shaking his hand.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *